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It’s no news flash that even college graduates get downsized, get laid off, or sometimes find it challenging to secure their dream job; however, results from numerous research studies show that college-educated individuals are much less likely to be unemployed, compared to their counterparts with a high school diploma.

The Pew Research Center’s 2014 report found that only 3.8 percent of college graduates between the ages of 25 and 32 were unemployed in 2013, compared to the staggering 12.2 percent of job seekers with just a high school diploma.

In 2013, the National Center for Policy Analysis published a report that found 4.3 percent of senior citizens aged 65 and older who had a college degree were more likely to be employed than the same demographic of high school graduates.

The Pew Research Center’s 2014 report found that only 3.8 percent of college graduates between the ages of 25 and 32 were unemployed in 2013, compared to the staggering 12.2 percent of job seekers with just a high school diploma.

From a 2016 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report, 2.8 percent of college graduates were unemployed in 2015 compared to 5.4 percent of unemployed high school graduates that same year.

Further, the 2016 Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce study revealed 11.5 million jobs were offered to candidates who had completed at least some college courses compared to the 80,000 positions that were offered to job seekers with a high school diploma or less after the most recent recession.

While a college degree, of course, cannot guarantee your employment status throughout your career, it can help you be a more viable candidate and have a greater chance of securing employment – even beyond the age of 65 – than had you not continued with your studies after high school.

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